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Name File Type Size Last Modified
  20150020_data 10/12/2019 03:36:AM
LICENSE.txt text/plain 14.6 KB 10/11/2019 11:36:PM

Project Citation: 

Galor, Oded, and Özak, Ömer. Replication data for: The Agricultural Origins of Time Preference. Nashville, TN: American Economic Association [publisher], 2016. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2019-10-12. https://doi.org/10.3886/E113035V1

Project Description

Summary:  View help for Summary This research explores the origins of observed differences in time preference across countries and regions. Exploiting a natural experiment associated with the expansion of suitable crops for cultivation in the course of the Columbian Exchange, the research establishes that pre-industrial agro-climatic characteristics which were conducive to higher return to agricultural investment triggered selection, adaptation, and learning processes that generated a persistent positive effect on the prevalence of long-term orientation in the contemporary era. Furthermore, the research establishes that these agro-climatic characteristics have had a culturally embodied impact on economic behavior such as technological adoption, education, saving, and smoking.

Scope of Project

JEL Classification:  View help for JEL Classification
      D72 Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
      G21 Banks; Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
      G28 Financial Institutions and Services: Government Policy and Regulation


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