Search openICPSR


Find and share social, behavioral, and health sciences research data.

  • Search terms can be anywhere in the study: title, description, variables, etc.
  • Because our holdings are large, we recommend using at least two query terms:
    rural economy
    home ownership
    higher education
    ghana adolescents
  • Keywords help delimit the breadth of results. Therefore, use as many as required to achieve your desired results:
    elementary education federal funding
  • Our search will find studies with derivative expressions of your query terms: A search for "nation" will find results containing "national"
  • Use quotes to search for an exact expression:
    "social mobility"
  • You can combine exact expressions with loose terms:
    "united states" inmates
  • Exclude results by using a MINUS sign:
    elections -sweden -germany
    elections -sweden -germany
  • On the results page, you will be able to sort and filter to further refine results.
  • Please note that your search queries only openICPSR data holdings.
CLOSE
Name File Type Size Last Modified
  data 10/12/2019 02:44:PM
LICENSE.txt text/plain 14.6 KB 10/12/2019 10:44:AM

Project Citation: 

Heyes, Anthony, and Saberian, Soodeh. Replication data for: Temperature and Decisions: Evidence from 207,000 Court Cases. Nashville, TN: American Economic Association [publisher], 2019. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2019-10-12. https://doi.org/10.3886/E113722V1

Project Description

Summary:  View help for Summary We analyze the impact of outdoor temperature on high-stakes decisions (immigration adjudications) made by professional decision-makers (US immigration judges). In our preferred specification, which includes spatial, temporal, and judge fixed effects, and controls for various potential confounders, a 10°F degree increase in case-day temperature reduces decisions favorable to the applicant by 6.55 percent. This is despite judgements being made indoors, "protected" by climate control. Results are consistent with established links from temperature to mood and risk appetite and have important implications for evaluating the influence of climate on "cognitive output."

Scope of Project

JEL Classification:  View help for JEL Classification
      K37 Immigration Law
      K41 Litigation Process
      Q54 Climate; Natural Disasters and Their Management; Global Warming


Related Publications

Published Versions

Export Metadata

Report a Problem

Found a serious problem with the data, such as disclosure risk or copyrighted content? Let us know.

This material is distributed exactly as it arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigator(s) if further information is desired.