Search openICPSR


Find and share social, behavioral, and health sciences research data.

  • Search terms can be anywhere in the study: title, description, variables, etc.
  • Because our holdings are large, we recommend using at least two query terms:
    rural economy
    home ownership
    higher education
    ghana adolescents
  • Keywords help delimit the breadth of results. Therefore, use as many as required to achieve your desired results:
    elementary education federal funding
  • Our search will find studies with derivative expressions of your query terms: A search for "nation" will find results containing "national"
  • Use quotes to search for an exact expression:
    "social mobility"
  • You can combine exact expressions with loose terms:
    "united states" inmates
  • Exclude results by using a MINUS sign:
    elections -sweden -germany
    elections -sweden -germany
  • On the results page, you will be able to sort and filter to further refine results.
  • Please note that your search queries only openICPSR data holdings.
CLOSE
Name File Type Size Last Modified
  20150503_data 10/12/2019 03:51:AM
LICENSE.txt text/plain 14.6 KB 10/11/2019 11:51:PM

Project Citation: 

Blattman, Christopher, Jamison, Julian C., and Sheridan, Margaret. Replication data for: Reducing Crime and Violence: Experimental Evidence from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Liberia. Nashville, TN: American Economic Association [publisher], 2017. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2019-10-12. https://doi.org/10.3886/E113056V1

Project Description

Summary:  View help for Summary We show that a number of noncognitive skills and preferences, including patience and identity, are malleable in adults, and that investments in them reduce crime and violence. We recruited criminally engaged men and randomized one-half to eight weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy designed to foster self-regulation, patience, and a noncriminal identity and lifestyle. We also randomized $200 grants. Cash alone and therapy alone initially reduced crime and violence, but effects dissipated over time. When cash followed therapy, crime and violence decreased dramatically for at least a year. We hypothesize that cash reinforced therapy's impacts by prolonging learning-by doing, lifestyle changes, and self-investment.

Scope of Project

JEL Classification:  View help for JEL Classification
      D12 Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
      D83 Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
      H23 Taxation and Subsidies: Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
      I32 Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
      K42 Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
      O15 Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
      O17 Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements


Related Publications

Published Versions

Export Metadata

Report a Problem

Found a serious problem with the data, such as disclosure risk or copyrighted content? Let us know.

This material is distributed exactly as it arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigator(s) if further information is desired.